Butch On Bug-Out Bags

Over the last year or so my personal bug-out bag (a bag designed to have just about everything you need to be self sufficient for 2-3 days) has undergone quite a transformation. Version one, having been put together by a rather poorly informed and under educated Butch, contained little more than a change of clothes, two flashlights, and some powerbars. Certainly better than nothing but not nearly adequate for even the lowest grade emergency situations.

My current bag is much more robust and I’ll list the contents at the bottom of the article for anyone who’s curious or has any input for me as I’m always looking to upgrade my supplies in a reasonable fashion.

Before I get to that I’d like to say a few things about my personal opinion on bugging out in general. First of all, I believe that in all but the absolute worst of situations my goal will be to Get To My House, not to run away from it. Sure, it’s possible that a massive earthquake could render my house unlivable, but even then my plan would be to stay on my property. The last thing I would want would be to become a refugee with no secure home base. Preparing for an event that is severe enough to cause me to flee my home and property would require a retreat location and full plan for evacuating the area. I’d love to have a cabin tucked away someplace secure for just such an occasion but I’m not quite there yet. In the meantime, my plan is to get home where I have all the things I need to be self sufficient for at least a couple of months. This bag should help me do that and if the worst should happen, I think it will serve pretty well in an all out retreat as well.

As such, I put my bag together with my typical daily routine in mind. I spend most days at an office, which is more than ten miles from my house, and takes me across a couple of different freeways. If we were to experience a minor earthquake or even just a power outage it could be very very difficult in not impossible for me to make it home in one day. I may find myself camped out in my office or even stuck in gridlock traffic somewhere. This is not some far-fetched scenario. In fact, something similar happens to people everyday. So it is with this mindset that I put together the following items into an ordinary looking backpack that I keep in the back of my car. I should also note that in just the past three months I’ve used more than a few of the items in situations that were not emergencies but where they certainly came in handy (I replaced them immediately afterward). Whether that was treating a minor cut or scrape, or feeding a hungry youngster at a soccer game it was nice to have my bag with me.

Contents:

Set of clothes and comfortable shoes appropriate for current season/climate
Purell
Travel toiletry set
Powerbars
Bottled water
Over-The-Counter Medicines (assorted to your personal needs)
Small amount of personal prescription medicines (if needed)
AM/FM radio with spare batteries
Candy bars
Small first aid kit
Flashlight with spare batteries
Glowsticks
Foil packets of tuna
Bag of trail mix
Folding knife
Leatherman Tool
Space blankets
Plastic ponchos
Winter hat
Pepper spray
Butane lighter, matches, firestarter
Copy of health insurance i.d. cards
Copy of driver’s license
A few hundred dollars in cash in small bills
Duct tape
Spare eyeglasses
Babywipes
List of important phone numbers
Paracord
Garbage bags

It’s important to note that you need to pull out your bag and update the contents every couple of months to make sure items are fresh and/or appropriate for the season. A pair of wool pants and a heavy sweater will do you little good if you’re facing a five mile walk home in August. However, a pair of shorts, T-shirt, and running shoes would be a lifesaver. Good, effective preparation involves intelligent anticipation. I can not stress this enough. And while we can’t anticipate everything, and in this blog [unlike some others] we won’t attempt to, we’ll try to get ready for what’s most likely to happen and not give up our lives and hide away in a cave while waiting for the zombie apocalypse…

3 Responses to Butch On Bug-Out Bags

  1. Unless you plan on toting a bunch of water, you should probably include either some chemical means of purifing water or some type of travel filter appartus, or both. It doesn’t add much extra wieght but opens your options considerably. You never now when you might be forced to ground or have to detour considerable distances.

  2. Got the referral to this site from Survival Blog; my wife and I have been reading there for about two years. Interesting items in your BOB. Here is a list of our items, all carried in a “Sea Bag”:
    BASEBALL CAP, SCARF, MOSQUITO NETTING, & KNIT CAP
    EXTRA SHOES/SOCKS
    SWEAT PANTS & SWEAT SHIRT
    GLOVES WITH LINERS (GI) & INSULATED GLOVES
    UNDERWEAR
    JACKET
    • FOOD & WATER
    WATER (IN SMALL BOTTLES)
    INSTANT FOODS/SNACKS (IN FOOD BAG)
    WATER PURIFYING BOTTLE (IN FOOD BAG)
    • SHELTER
    TUBE TENT, PILLOWCASE, UTILITY TAPE
    SLEEPING BAG
    BLANKET & PONCHO
    FIRE STARTING KIT
    PLASTIC BAGS
    MINI PLAYING CARDS
    25 FEET UTILITY CORD
    • TOOLS
    FOLDING SAW
    FIXED-BLADE KNIFE
    MAPS- COUNTY & STATE
    COMPASS (IN FIRST AID KIT)
    100 RNDS 45 ACP AMMO
    • FIRST AID KIT
    MULTI-TOOL & CAN OPENER (P-38)
    NYLON LASHING TAPE
    FIRE STARTING KIT
    G.I. PRESSURE BANDAGE & ASSORTED BANDAGES
    BANDAGE TAPE
    ASSORTED TOPICAL OINTMENTS
    TOOTH PASTE & BRUSH
    DUCT TAPE
    ASPIRIN, PAIN RELIEVERS
    GATORADE
    FLASH LIGHTS
    ZIP TIES AND FASTENERS
    UTILITY TAPE/ROPE
    EMERGENCY (SHOCK) BLANKET
    • HEALTH & GROOMING:
    BABY WIPES
    GARBAGE BAGS
    SMALL TOWEL
    TOILET PAPER
    Please note that the list is not inclusive of all of the first aid items, I have a separate list stashed inside of the FAK to check the contents therein. All items selected (except the clothing, of course) have multiple uses, and the BOBS we carry now weigh about 40 lbs each. I was surprised at how comfortably this amount of weight can be carried, and I was also surprised at how much room there is left in the bags if you are using the spare clothing. For practicality’s sake, the bedding & tent are packed in first, then surrounded by the tools (stashed AWAY from the wearer’s shoulder straps for comfort), then clothing and other items, with the FAK going into the bag last (LIFO). If you need First Aid, the last thing you want to do with an injured arm/shoulder/hand is dig to the bottom of the BOB to get the FAK!!
    We are taking these bags everywhere with us now- she travels to the next state frequently, I mostly stay within an hour and a half of the homeplace. These BOB’s have become just another thing that we take care of when we travel, and it has become second nature after just a few trips.

    God Bless, and keep your head up!
    Philippians 4:18

    ST

  3. PS- there is a REASON why we each carry an extra 100 rounds of 45ACP.
    And, If forgot to mention that we carry some energy foods. We tried to stick to foods that need no prep (cooking/heating) for convenience.
    Great emphasis should be placed on having a plan during travel, whether alone or as a pair. Regular phone contact should be made if traveling separately.